UCLA team demonstrates carbon dioxide recycling in precast production

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A University of California, Los Angeles team in the final round of the $20 million NRG Cosia Carbon Xprize competition has scheduled a February 2020 demonstration of a process yielding concrete blocks or elements through capture of carbon dioxide gas in coal-fired power generation. Carbon Upcycling UCLA will stage the 30-day undertaking at the Dry Fork Station near Gillette, Wyo.; members see daily production of up to 10 tons of their CO2ncrete-trademarked units for use in wall construction.

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UCLA team demonstrates carbon capture in precast block production

Sources: University of California, Los Angeles; CP staff

A University of California, Los Angeles team in the final round of the $20 million NRG Cosia Carbon Xprize competition has scheduled a February 2020 demonstration of a process yielding precast concrete blocks with carbon dioxide gas from coal-fired power generation. Carbon Upcycling UCLA will stage the 30-day undertaking at the Dry Fork Station near Gillette, Wyo.; members see daily production of up to 10 tons of their CO2ncrete-trademarked units for use in wall construction. 

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Researchers eye reverse calcination for reduced-carbon cement production

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Targeting lower net carbon dioxide emissions in portland cement milling, University of California, Los Angeles researchers propose introduction of calcium hydroxide at the calcination phase, when high temperatures split limestone raw feed into CO2 gas and calcium oxide. Lab-scale tests in their National Science Foundation-backed investigation indicate the potential to sequester CO2 and recreate limestone in a continuous loop.

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Researchers eye reverse calcination for reduced-carbon cement production

Sources: University of California, Los Angles; CP staff

Targeting lower net carbon dioxide emissions in portland cement milling, University of California, Los Angeles researchers propose introduction of calcium hydroxide, or hydrated lime, at the calcination phase, when high temperatures split limestone raw feed into CO2 gas and calcium oxide. Lab-scale tests in their National Science Foundation-backed investigation indicate the potential to sequester CO2 and recreate limestone in a continuous loop.

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