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Cold weather concreting essential: Monitoring mix temperature

When placing in cold weather, extra precautions must be taken to ensure concrete sets properly and gains adequate strength. The Transtec Group, Texas-based concrete pavement practitioner, notes how the first few days after placement are the most important because that is when cement hydration reaction proceeds the fastest and concrete gains most of its compressive strength. However, cold conditions slow the hydration process, meaning that concrete placed in low temperatures gains less strength than the same mix in warmer temperatures during the same length of time. If the water in the concrete mix freezes, the hydration process stops completely. Even if it thaws, strength gain may not recover.

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Five reasons customer relationship management matters to your business

What exactly is customer relationship management, or CRM, and why does it matter to a ready-mix producer? Perhaps no other acronym in the software industry has been as intentionally obscured by used-car-turned-software-salesmen. It’s important to know the truth about why you really do need CRM.

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Customers Rank

Use technology to decide who matters most and how to quote them.

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Engineers ground rebar, climbing formwork in tower core ascent

An 850-ft. mixed-use tower has rapidly climbed into the Seattle skyline on the strength of a unique core wall system with requisite volumes of high performance concrete but no conventional rebar. Topped out in early August, Rainier Square Tower marks the debut of what Seattle engineer Magnusson Klemencic Associates (MKA) dubs the Concrete-Filled Composite Plate Shear Wall (CPSW) system.

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Master Builders mixes mortar for Manhattan monarchs

Material science behind lightweight concrete and self-consolidating mixtures yields a principal element of the Monarch Sanctuary, a 15-ft. “vertical butterfly meadow” prototype on display at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum, New York City.

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