Volvo tests artificial intelligence in truck safety

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Volvo Trucks North America, along with automated vehicle software provider Perceptive Automata and customer Dependable Highway Express (DHE), is proving the potential to raise drivers’ safety performance by leveraging human intuition artificial intelligence that predicts pedestrian, cyclist and motorist actions. The manufacturer recognizes the need for improved safety for all road users, specifically to augment situational awareness and better anticipate human behavior while on the road. It demonstrated a proof-of-concept, based on Perceptive Automata’s artificial intelligence software, with a Volvo VNR 300 regional-haul model at DHE’s Ontario, Calif., headquarters.

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Drone-derived data, artificial intelligence rewrite concrete inspection

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Dynam.AI, a provider of end-to-end artificial intelligence (AI) for businesses, and GBA, engineering and architecture solutions developer, have entered a partnership to refine methods of identifying and assessing bridge defects—a market whose potential is underscored in a 2019 American Road & Transportation Builders Association report indicating 47,000-plus crossings deemed structurally deficient.

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Artificial intelligence, drone specialists retool concrete bridge inspection

Sources: Dynam.AI, San Diego; GBA, Lenexa, Kan.; CP staff

Dynam.AI, a provider of end-to-end artificial intelligence (AI) for businesses, and GBA, engineering and architecture solutions developer, have entered a partnership to refine methods of identifying and assessing bridge defects—a market whose potential is underscored in a 2019 American Road & Transportation Builders Association report indicating 47,000-plus crossings deemed structurally deficient.

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Artificial intelligence drives injury reduction effort for masons

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Artificial intelligence (AI) is giving University of Waterloo, Ontario, researchers new insights to help reduce wear-and-tear injuries and boost the productivity of skilled construction workers. Motion sensor data and AI software reveal how expert bricklayers use previously unidentified techniques to limit the loads on their joints—knowledge that can now be passed on to apprentices.

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Artificial intelligence, sensors drive injury reduction research for masons

Sources: University of Waterloo, Ontario; CP staff

Artificial intelligence (AI) is giving University of Waterloo researchers new insights to help reduce wear-and-tear injuries and boost the productivity of skilled construction workers. Motion sensor data and AI software reveal how expert bricklayers use previously unidentified techniques to limit the loads on their joints—knowledge that can now be passed on to apprentices.

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